Aquacultural Managers

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About the Job

Direct and coordinate, through subordinate supervisory personnel, activities of workers engaged in fish hatchery production for corporations, cooperatives, or other owners.

It is also Called

  • Aquaculture Cooperative Marketing Director
  • Aquaculture Director
  • Aquaculture Farm Manager
  • Aquaculture Professor
  • Aquaculture Program Director
  • Aquaculturist
  • Farm Operations Technical Director
  • Finfish Aquaculture Specialist
  • Fisheries Technician
  • Fish Farmer

What They Do

  • Design and construct pens, floating stations, and collector strings or fences for sea farms.
  • Scuba dive in order to inspect sea farm operations.
  • Identify environmental requirements of a particular species, and select and oversee the preparation of sites for species cultivation.
  • Prepare reports required by state and federal laws.
  • Confer with biologists, fish pathologists, and other fishery personnel to obtain data concerning fish habits, diseases, food, and environmental requirements.
  • Operate and maintain cultivating and harvesting equipment.
  • Determine how to allocate resources, and how to respond to unanticipated problems such as insect infestation, drought, and fire.
  • Collect information regarding techniques for fish collection and fertilization, spawn incubation, and treatment of spawn and fry.
  • Determine, administer, and execute policies relating to operations administration and standards, and facility maintenance.
  • Direct and monitor the transfer of mature fish to lakes, ponds, streams, or commercial tanks.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: ERC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Enterprising interests, but also prefer Realistic and Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Independence, but also value Working Conditions and Achievement in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Biology - Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
  • Food Production - Knowledge of techniques and equipment for planting, growing, and harvesting food products (both plant and animal) for consumption, including storage/handling techniques.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Time Management - Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.

Education Required

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor's degree, but some do not.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in Washington was $74,440 with most people making between $44,160 and $112,280

Outlook

Washington projection information is not available

Industries that Employ this Occupation

Industry breakdown is not available for this occupation