Auditors

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About the Job

Examine and analyze accounting records to determine financial status of establishment and prepare financial reports concerning operating procedures.

It is also Called

  • Account Auditor
  • Accounting Auditor
  • Asset Analyst
  • Assurance Manager
  • Assurance Senior
  • Audit Manager
  • Audit Partner
  • Auditor
  • Auditor-in-Charge
  • City Auditor

What They Do

  • Collect and analyze data to detect deficient controls, duplicated effort, extravagance, fraud, or non-compliance with laws, regulations, and management policies.
  • Prepare detailed reports on audit findings.
  • Supervise auditing of establishments, and determine scope of investigation required.
  • Report to management about asset utilization and audit results, and recommend changes in operations and financial activities.
  • Inspect account books and accounting systems for efficiency, effectiveness, and use of accepted accounting procedures to record transactions.
  • Examine records and interview workers to ensure recording of transactions and compliance with laws and regulations.
  • Examine and evaluate financial and information systems, recommending controls to ensure system reliability and data integrity.
  • Review data about material assets, net worth, liabilities, capital stock, surplus, income, and expenditures.
  • Confer with company officials about financial and regulatory matters.
  • Examine whether the organization's objectives are reflected in its management activities, and whether employees understand the objectives.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: CEI.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Conventional interests, but also prefer Enterprising and Investigative environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Independence, but also value Achievement and Recognition in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Economics and Accounting - Knowledge of economic and accounting principles and practices, the financial markets, banking and the analysis and reporting of financial data.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.

Education Required

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor's degree, but some do not.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in New Jersey was $83,930 with most people making between $49,640 and $126,400

Outlook

1.03%
avg. annual growth

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 42,800 people in New Jersey. It is projected that there will be 47,200 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have about 440 openings due to growth and about 720 replacement openings for approximately 1,160 total annual openings.