Computer Hardware Engineers

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About the Job

Research, design, develop, or test computer or computer-related equipment for commercial, industrial, military, or scientific use. May supervise the manufacturing and installation of computer or computer-related equipment and components.

It is also Called

  • Telecommunications Engineer
  • Systems Integration Engineer
  • Systems Engineer
  • Supplier Quality Engineer (SQE)
  • Senior Hardware Engineer
  • Project Engineer
  • Network Engineer
  • Microchip Specialist
  • Information Technology Consultant (IT Consultant)
  • Hardware Engineer

What They Do

  • Provide training and support to system designers and users.
  • Recommend purchase of equipment to control dust, temperature, and humidity in area of system installation.
  • Assemble and modify existing pieces of equipment to meet special needs.
  • Analyze information to determine, recommend, and plan layout, including type of computers and peripheral equipment modifications.
  • Analyze user needs and recommend appropriate hardware.
  • Evaluate factors such as reporting formats required, cost constraints, and need for security restrictions to determine hardware configuration.
  • Store, retrieve, and manipulate data for analysis of system capabilities and requirements.
  • Provide technical support to designers, marketing and sales departments, suppliers, engineers and other team members throughout the product development and implementation process.
  • Direct technicians, engineering designers or other technical support personnel as needed.
  • Test and verify hardware and support peripherals to ensure that they meet specifications and requirements, by recording and analyzing test data.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: IRC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Investigative interests, but also prefer Realistic and Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Working Conditions, but also value Achievement and Recognition in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Design - Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Physics - Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.

Education Required

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor's degree, but some do not.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in New Jersey was $104,240 with most people making between $71,250 and $147,180

Outlook

0.00%
avg. annual growth

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 1,900 people in New Jersey. It is projected that there will be 1,800 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have about 0 openings due to growth and about 50 replacement openings for approximately 50 total annual openings.