Survey Researchers

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About the Job

Plan, develop, or conduct surveys. May analyze and interpret the meaning of survey data, determine survey objectives, or suggest or test question wording. Includes social scientists who primarily design questionnaires or supervise survey teams.

It is also Called

  • Consultant
  • Field Interviewer
  • Market Survey Representative
  • Pollster
  • Recruiter
  • Research Assistant
  • Research Associate
  • Research Fellow
  • Research Interviewer
  • Research Methodologist

What They Do

  • Write training manuals to be used by survey interviewers.
  • Review, classify, and record survey data in preparation for computer analysis.
  • Conduct research to gather information about survey topics.
  • Hire and train recruiters and data collectors.
  • Direct updates and changes in survey implementation and methods.
  • Analyze data from surveys, old records, or case studies, using statistical software.
  • Monitor and evaluate survey progress and performance, using sample disposition reports and response rate calculations.
  • Produce documentation of the questionnaire development process, data collection methods, sampling designs, and decisions related to sample statistical weighting.
  • Prepare and present summaries and analyses of survey data, including tables, graphs, and fact sheets that describe survey techniques and results.
  • Determine and specify details of survey projects, including sources of information, procedures to be used, and the design of survey instruments and materials.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: ICE.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Investigative interests, but also prefer Conventional and Enterprising environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Independence, but also value Achievement and Recognition in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Sociology and Anthropology - Knowledge of group behavior and dynamics, societal trends and influences, human migrations, ethnicity, cultures and their history and origins.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

Education Required

Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master's degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree).

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in New Jersey was $79,780 with most people making between $50,070 and $121,490

Outlook

1.43%
avg. annual growth

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 700 people in New Jersey. It is projected that there will be 800 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have about 10 openings due to growth and about 20 replacement openings for approximately 30 total annual openings.