Audio-Visual and Multimedia Collections Specialists

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About the Job

Prepare, plan, and operate multimedia teaching aids for use in education. May record, catalogue, and file materials.

It is also Called

  • Audio Video Technician
  • Audio-Visual Arts Director
  • Audio-Visual Collections Coordinator
  • Audio Visual Coordinator
  • Audio-Visual Director
  • Audiovisual Production Specialist
  • Audio Visual Secretary
  • Audio Visual Specialist
  • Audio-Visual Specialist
  • Audio Visual Technician

What They Do

  • Narrate presentations and productions.
  • Develop preproduction ideas and incorporate them into outlines, scripts, story boards, and graphics.
  • Locate and secure settings, properties, effects, and other production necessities.
  • Construct and position properties, sets, lighting equipment, and other equipment.
  • Produce rough and finished graphics and graphic designs.
  • Offer presentations and workshops on the role of multimedia in effective presentations.
  • Confer with teachers to select course materials and to determine which training aids are best suited to particular grade levels.
  • Develop manuals, texts, workbooks, or related materials for use in conjunction with production materials.
  • Attend conventions and conferences, read trade journals, and communicate with industry insiders to keep abreast of industry developments.
  • Acquire, catalog, and maintain collections of audiovisual material such as films, video- and audio-tapes, photographs, and software programs.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RCS.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Conventional and Social environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Relationships, but also value Independence and Working Conditions in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Communications and Media - Knowledge of media production, communication, and dissemination techniques and methods. This includes alternative ways to inform and entertain via written, oral, and visual media.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Time Management - Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Troubleshooting - Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.

Education Required

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor's degree, but some do not.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in Washington was $44,440 with most people making between $32,090 and $66,680

Outlook

1.11%
avg. annual growth

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 270 people in Washington. It is projected that there will be 300 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have about 3 openings due to growth and about 7 replacement openings for approximately 10 total annual openings.

Industries that Employ this Occupation

Industry breakdown is not available for this occupation