Respiratory Therapy Technicians

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About the Job

Provide respiratory care under the direction of respiratory therapists and physicians.

It is also Called

  • Certified Respiratory Therapist (CRT)
  • Certified Respiratory Therapy Technician (CRTT)
  • Life Support Technician
  • Oxygen Equipment Technician
  • Oxygen Therapy Technician
  • Registered Pulmonary Function Technologist
  • Registered Respiratory Therapist
  • Respiratory Care Practitioner
  • Respiratory Technician
  • Respiratory Therapist

What They Do

  • Monitor patients during treatment and report any unusual reactions to the respiratory therapist.
  • Use ventilators or various oxygen devices or aerosol and breathing treatments in the provision of respiratory therapy.
  • Work with patients in areas such as the emergency rooms, neonatal or pediatric intensive care, or surgical intensive care, treating conditions such as emphysema, chronic bronchitis, asthma, cystic fibrosis, or pneumonia.
  • Collect and analyze arterial blood gas samples.
  • Read and evaluate physicians' orders and patients' chart information to determine patients' condition and treatment protocols.
  • Set equipment controls to regulate the flow of oxygen, gases, mists, or aerosols.
  • Assess patients' response to treatments and modify treatments according to protocol if necessary.
  • Perform diagnostic procedures to assess the severity of respiratory dysfunction in patients.
  • Keep records of patients' therapy, completing all necessary forms.
  • Prepare or test devices, such as mechanical ventilators, therapeutic gas administration apparatus, environmental control systems, aerosol generators, or electrocardiogram (EKG) machines.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: SRI.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Social interests, but also prefer Realistic and Investigative environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Relationships, but also value Support and Achievement in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Medicine and Dentistry - Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Psychology - Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Service Orientation - Actively looking for ways to help people.
  • Social Perceptiveness - Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Education Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in New Jersey was $60,520 with most people making between $44,520 and $75,160

Outlook

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 400 people in New Jersey. It is projected that there will be 350 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have approximately 10 job openings annually.