Orthotists and Prosthetists

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About the Job

Design, measure, fit, and adapt orthopedic braces, appliances or prostheses, such as limbs or facial parts for patients with disabling conditions.

It is also Called

  • American Board Certified Orthotist (ABC Orthotist)
  • Artificial Limb Fitter
  • Board Certified and Licensed Orthotist/Prosthetist
  • Certified Orthotic Fitter
  • Certified Orthotist (CO)
  • Certified Orthotist/Pedorthist
  • Certified Orthotist, Practice Manager
  • Certified Orthotist/Practitioner Manager
  • Certified Prosthetist, Certified Pedorthist
  • Certified Prosthetist (CP)

What They Do

  • Publish research findings or present them at conferences and seminars.
  • Research new ways to construct and use orthopedic and prosthetic devices.
  • Show and explain orthopedic and prosthetic appliances to healthcare workers.
  • Repair, rebuild, and modify prosthetic and orthopedic appliances.
  • Update skills and knowledge by attending conferences and seminars.
  • Train and supervise support staff, such as orthopedic and prosthetic assistants and technicians.
  • Construct and fabricate appliances or supervise others constructing the appliances.
  • Confer with physicians to formulate specifications and prescriptions for orthopedic or prosthetic devices.
  • Make and modify plaster casts of areas that will be fitted with prostheses or orthoses, for use in the device construction process.
  • Design orthopedic and prosthetic devices, based on physicians' prescriptions and examination and measurement of patients.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: SRI.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Social interests, but also prefer Realistic and Investigative environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Relationships, but also value Independence and Achievement in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Medicine and Dentistry - Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Service Orientation - Actively looking for ways to help people.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Social Perceptiveness - Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.

Education Required

Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master's degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree).

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in New Jersey was $80,020 with most people making between $40,610 and $155,230

Outlook

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 150 people in New Jersey. It is projected that there will be 150 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have approximately - job openings annually.