Occupational Health and Safety Technicians

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About the Job

Collect data on work environments for analysis by occupational health and safety specialists. Implement and conduct evaluation of programs designed to limit chemical, physical, biological, and ergonomic risks to workers.

It is also Called

  • Construction Health and Safety Technician
  • Construction Safety Consultant
  • Consultant
  • Director of Safety
  • Environmental, Health, and Safety EHS Leader
  • Environmental Health Technologist
  • Ergonomics Technician
  • Health and Safety Coordinator
  • Health and Safety Tech
  • Mine Patrol

What They Do

  • Examine practices at green building sites to determine whether adherence to green building standards alters risks to workers.
  • Confer with schools, state authorities, or community groups to develop health standards or programs.
  • Examine credentials, licenses, or permits to ensure compliance with licensing requirements.
  • Educate the public about health issues or enforce health legislation to prevent disease, to promote health, or to help people understand health protection procedures and regulations.
  • Perform tests to identify any potential hazards related to recycled products used at green building sites.
  • Collect data regarding potential hazards from new equipment or products linked to green practices.
  • Test or balance newly installed HVAC systems to determine whether indoor air quality standards are met.
  • Collect data related to ecological or human health risks at brownfield sites.
  • Conduct interviews to obtain information or evidence regarding communicable diseases or violations of health or sanitation regulations.
  • Review records or reports concerning laboratory results, staffing, floor plans, fire inspections, or sanitation to gather information for the development or enforcement of safety activities.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: CR.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Conventional interests, but also prefer Realistic environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Relationships, but also value Support and Achievement in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Law and Government - Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.

Education Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in Washington was $68,310 with most people making between $41,100 and $92,420

Outlook

1.18%
avg. annual growth

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 340 people in Washington. It is projected that there will be 390 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have about 4 openings due to growth and about 16 replacement openings for approximately 20 total annual openings.