Forest Fire Fighting and Prevention Supervisors

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About the Job

Supervise fire fighters who control and suppress fires in forests or vacant public land.

It is also Called

  • Squad Boss
  • Smoke Jumper Supervisor
  • Single Resource Boss
  • Section Forest Fire Warden
  • Hotshot Superintendent
  • Forestry Technician
  • Forest Officer
  • Forest Manager
  • Forest Fire Specialist Supervisor
  • Firefighter Type One (FFT1)

What They Do

  • Appraise damage caused by fires and prepare damage reports.
  • Direct investigations of suspected arson in wildfires, working closely with other investigating agencies.
  • Observe fires or crews from air to determine firefighting force requirements or to note changing conditions that will affect firefighting efforts.
  • Educate the public about forest fire prevention by participating in activities such as exhibits or presentations or by distributing promotional materials.
  • Lead work crews in the maintenance of structures or access roads in forest areas.
  • Investigate special fire issues, such as railroad fire problems, right-of-way burning, or slash disposal problems.
  • Recommend equipment modifications or new equipment purchases.
  • Review and evaluate employee performance.
  • Perform administrative duties, such as compiling and maintaining records, completing forms, preparing reports, or composing correspondence.
  • Regulate open burning by issuing burning permits, inspecting problem sites, issuing citations for violations of laws and ordinances, or educating the public in proper burning practices.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: ERC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Enterprising interests, but also prefer Realistic and Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Achievement and Working Conditions in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Personnel and Human Resources - Knowledge of principles and procedures for personnel recruitment, selection, training, compensation and benefits, labor relations and negotiation, and personnel information systems.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.

Education Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in New Jersey was $106,320 with most people making between $75,520 and $142,960

Outlook

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 1,700 people in New Jersey. It is projected that there will be 1,700 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have approximately 90 job openings annually.