Forest Fire Fighting and Prevention Supervisors

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About the Job

Supervise fire fighters who control and suppress fires in forests or vacant public land.

It is also Called

  • County Forest Ranger
  • Crew Boss
  • Engine Boss
  • Fire Apparatus Engineer
  • Fire Captain
  • Fire Fighter
  • Fire Hand Crew Boss
  • Fire Management Officer
  • Fire Supervisor
  • Firefighter

What They Do

  • Communicate fire details to superiors, subordinates, or interagency dispatch centers, using two-way radios.
  • Serve as a working leader of an engine, hand, helicopter, or prescribed fire crew of three or more firefighters.
  • Maintain fire suppression equipment in good condition, checking equipment periodically to ensure that it is ready for use.
  • Evaluate size, location, and condition of forest fires and request and dispatch crews and position equipment so fires can be contained safely and effectively.
  • Operate wildland fire engines or hoselays.
  • Monitor prescribed burns to ensure that they are conducted safely and effectively.
  • Direct and supervise prescribed burn projects and prepare postburn reports, analyzing burn conditions and results.
  • Identify staff training and development needs to ensure that appropriate training can be arranged.
  • Maintain knowledge of forest fire laws and fire prevention techniques and tactics.
  • Recommend equipment modifications or new equipment purchases.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: ERC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Enterprising interests, but also prefer Realistic and Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Achievement and Working Conditions in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Building and Construction - Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • Geography - Knowledge of principles and methods for describing the features of land, sea, and air masses, including their physical characteristics, locations, interrelationships, and distribution of plant, animal, and human life.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Time Management - Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Education Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in United States was $72,670 with most people making between $41,050 and $111,120

Outlook

0.00%
avg. annual growth

During 2010, this occupation employed approximately 60,000 people in United States. It is projected that there will be 65,000 employed in 2020.

This occupation will have about 0 openings due to growth and about 33,000 replacement openings for approximately 33,000 total annual openings.