Glaziers

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About the Job

Install glass in windows, skylights, store fronts, and display cases, or on surfaces, such as building fronts, interior walls, ceilings, and tabletops.

It is also Called

  • Art Glass Setter
  • Glass Fitter
  • Glass Glazier
  • Glass Inserter
  • Glass Installer
  • Glass Mechanic
  • Glass Setter
  • Glazer
  • Glazier
  • Glazier Apprentice

What They Do

  • Read and interpret blueprints or specifications to determine size, shape, color, type, or thickness of glass, location of framing, installation procedures, or staging or scaffolding materials required.
  • Determine plumb of walls or ceilings, using plumb lines and levels.
  • Fabricate or install metal sashes or moldings for glass installation, using aluminum or steel framing.
  • Measure mirrors and dimensions of areas to be covered to determine work procedures.
  • Fasten glass panes into wood sashes or frames with clips, points, or moldings, adding weather seals or putty around pane edges to seal joints.
  • Secure mirrors in position, using mastic cement, putty, bolts, or screws.
  • Cut, fit, install, repair, or replace glass or glass substitutes, such as plastic or aluminum, in building interiors or exteriors or in furniture or other products.
  • Cut and remove broken glass prior to installing replacement glass.
  • Set glass doors into frames and bolt metal hinges, handles, locks, or other hardware to attach doors to frames and walls.
  • Score glass with cutters' wheels, breaking off excess glass by hand or with notched tools.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Working Conditions, but also value Relationships and Achievement in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Building and Construction - Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Design - Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.

Education Required

These occupations usually require a high school diploma.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in New Jersey was $58,950 with most people making between $33,050 and $89,560

Outlook

0.00%
avg. annual growth

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 1,350 people in New Jersey. It is projected that there will be 1,300 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have about 0 openings due to growth and about 50 replacement openings for approximately 50 total annual openings.