Radio Mechanics

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About the Job

Test or repair mobile or stationary radio transmitting and receiving equipment and two-way radio communications systems used in ship-to-shore communications and found in service and emergency vehicles.

It is also Called

  • Broadcasting Equipment Mechanic
  • Electronic Equipment Repairer
  • Electronics Technician
  • Field Service Technician
  • Field Technician
  • Radio Adjuster
  • Radio Electrician
  • Radio Frequency Technician
  • Radio Installer
  • Radio Machinist

What They Do

  • Clean and lubricate motor generators.
  • Monitor radio range stations to detect transmission flaws and adjust controls to eliminate flaws.
  • Test batteries, using hydrometers and ammeters, and charge batteries as necessary.
  • Insert plugs into receptacles, and bolt or screw leads to terminals in order to connect equipment to power sources, using hand tools.
  • Mount equipment on transmission towers and in vehicles such as ships or ambulances.
  • Test emergency transmitters to ensure their readiness for immediate use.
  • Turn setscrews to adjust receivers for maximum sensitivity and transmitters for maximum output.
  • Calibrate and align components, using scales, gauges, and other measuring instruments.
  • Remove and replace defective components and parts such as conductors, resistors, semiconductors, and integrated circuits, using soldering irons, wire cutters, and hand tools.
  • Examine malfunctioning radio equipment to locate defects such as loose connections, broken wires, or burned-out components, using schematic diagrams and test equipment.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RIC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Investigative and Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Independence and Relationships in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Telecommunications - Knowledge of transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Repairing - Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
  • Quality Control Analysis - Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
  • Equipment Maintenance - Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Troubleshooting - Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Education Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in New Jersey was $59,030 with most people making between $35,620 and $73,690

Outlook

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 50 people in New Jersey. It is projected that there will be 50 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have approximately - job openings annually.