Avionics Technicians

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About the Job

Install, inspect, test, adjust, or repair avionics equipment, such as radar, radio, navigation, and missile control systems in aircraft or space vehicles.

It is also Called

  • Automatic Pilot Mechanic
  • Aviation Electrical Technician
  • Aviation Electrician
  • Aircraft Armament Mechanic
  • Aircraft Electrical Systems Specialist
  • Aircraft Electrician
  • Aircraft Instrument Mechanic
  • Airplane Electrical Repairer
  • Airplane Electrician
  • Airplane Technician

What They Do

  • Set up and operate ground support and test equipment to perform functional flight tests of electrical and electronic systems.
  • Test and troubleshoot instruments, components, and assemblies, using circuit testers, oscilloscopes, or voltmeters.
  • Keep records of maintenance and repair work.
  • Coordinate work with that of engineers, technicians, and other aircraft maintenance personnel.
  • Interpret flight test data to diagnose malfunctions and systemic performance problems.
  • Install electrical and electronic components, assemblies, and systems in aircraft, using hand tools, power tools, or soldering irons.
  • Adjust, repair, or replace malfunctioning components or assemblies, using hand tools or soldering irons.
  • Connect components to assemblies such as radio systems, instruments, magnetos, inverters, and in-flight refueling systems, using hand tools and soldering irons.
  • Assemble components such as switches, electrical controls, and junction boxes, using hand tools or soldering irons.
  • Fabricate parts and test aids as required.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RIC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Investigative and Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Relationships and Achievement in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Repairing - Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
  • Equipment Maintenance - Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
  • Troubleshooting - Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.

Education Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in New Jersey was $53,130 with most people making between $39,520 and $67,210

Outlook

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 150 people in New Jersey. It is projected that there will be 150 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have approximately - job openings annually.