Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers

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About the Job

Repair, maintain, or install electric motors, wiring, or switches.

It is also Called

  • Wind Generating Electric Power Installer
  • Vacuum Cleaner Repair Person
  • Transformer Repairer
  • Transformer Mechanic
  • Tool Technician
  • Tool Repairer
  • Tool Repair Technician
  • Tool Maintenance Worker
  • Switchgear Repairer
  • Starter Mechanic

What They Do

  • Hammer out dents and twists in tools and equipment.
  • Seal joints with putty, mortar, and asbestos, using putty extruders and knives.
  • Sharpen tools such as saws, picks, shovels, screwdrivers, and scoops, either manually or by using bench grinders and emery wheels.
  • Add water or acid to battery cell solutions to obtain specified concentrations.
  • Repair and operate battery-charging equipment.
  • Test battery charges, and replace or recharge batteries as necessary.
  • Steam-clean polishing and buffing wheels to remove abrasives and bonding materials, and spray, brush, or recoat surfaces as necessary.
  • Inspect batteries for structural defects such as dented cans, damaged carbon rods and terminals, and defective seals.
  • Clean, rinse, and dry transformer cases, using boiling water, scrapers, solvents, hoses, and cloths.
  • Test conditions, fluid levels, and specific gravities of electrolyte cells, using voltmeters, hydrometers, and thermometers.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Relationships and Working Conditions in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Repairing - Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
  • Troubleshooting - Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
  • Quality Control Analysis - Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
  • Equipment Maintenance - Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Equipment Selection - Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.

Education Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in New Jersey was $48,590 with most people making between $33,420 and $67,810

Outlook

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 400 people in New Jersey. It is projected that there will be 400 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have approximately 10 job openings annually.