Rail Car Repairers

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About the Job

Diagnose, adjust, repair, or overhaul railroad rolling stock, mine cars, or mass transit rail cars.

It is also Called

  • Air Brake Adjuster
  • Air Brake Man
  • Air Brake Mechanic
  • Air Brake Rigger
  • Air Brake Worker
  • Air Compressor Mechanic
  • Airman
  • Air Valve Mechanic
  • Air Valve Repairer
  • Brake Adjuster

What They Do

  • Repair window sash frames, attach weather stripping and channels to frames, and replace window glass, using hand tools.
  • Repair car upholstery.
  • Paint car exteriors, interiors, and fixtures.
  • Examine car roofs for wear and damage, and repair defective sections, using roofing material, cement, nails, and waterproof paint.
  • Install and repair interior flooring, fixtures, walls, plumbing, steps, and platforms.
  • Test electrical systems of cars by operating systems and using testing equipment such as ammeters.
  • Replace defective wiring and insulation, and tighten electrical connections, using hand tools.
  • Align car sides for installation of car ends and crossties, using width gauges, turnbuckles, and wrenches.
  • Measure diameters of axle wheel seats, using micrometers, and mark dimensions on axles so that wheels can be bored to specified dimensions.
  • Disassemble units such as water pumps, control valves, and compressors so that repairs can be made.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RIC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Investigative and Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Working Conditions and Independence in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Repairing - Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
  • Troubleshooting - Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
  • Equipment Maintenance - Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Quality Control Analysis - Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.

Education Required

These occupations usually require a high school diploma.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in New Jersey was $51,400 with most people making between $40,470 and $60,400

Outlook

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 100 people in New Jersey. It is projected that there will be 100 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have approximately - job openings annually.