Electrical Power-Line Installers and Repairers

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About the Job

Install or repair cables or wires used in electrical power or distribution systems. May erect poles and light or heavy duty transmission towers.

It is also Called

  • A Class Lineman
  • Aerial Lineman
  • Apprentice Lineman Third Step
  • Cable Inspector
  • Cable Installer Repairer
  • Cable Installer-Repairer
  • Cable Layer
  • Cable Splicer
  • Cable Splicer Apprentice
  • Cable Splicer Assistant

What They Do

  • Adhere to safety practices and procedures, such as checking equipment regularly and erecting barriers around work areas.
  • Test conductors, according to electrical diagrams and specifications, to identify corresponding conductors and to prevent incorrect connections.
  • Open switches or attach grounding devices to remove electrical hazards from disturbed or fallen lines or to facilitate repairs.
  • Climb poles or use truck-mounted buckets to access equipment.
  • Drive vehicles equipped with tools and materials to job sites.
  • Identify defective sectionalizing devices, circuit breakers, fuses, voltage regulators, transformers, switches, relays, or wiring, using wiring diagrams and electrical-testing instruments.
  • Install, maintain, and repair electrical distribution and transmission systems, including conduits, cables, wires, and related equipment, such as transformers, circuit breakers, and switches.
  • Dig holes, using augers, and set poles, using cranes and power equipment.
  • Place insulating or fireproofing materials over conductors and joints.
  • Install watt-hour meters and connect service drops between power lines and consumers' facilities.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RIC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Investigative and Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Independence and Working Conditions in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Physics - Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Troubleshooting - Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Education Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in United States was $63,380 with most people making between $36,370 and $91,150

Outlook

0.93%
avg. annual growth

During 2010, this occupation employed approximately 108,000 people in United States. It is projected that there will be 122,000 employed in 2020.

This occupation will have about 1,000 openings due to growth and about 51,000 replacement openings for approximately 52,000 total annual openings.