Electrical Power-Line Installers and Repairers

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About the Job

Install or repair cables or wires used in electrical power or distribution systems. May erect poles and light or heavy duty transmission towers.

It is also Called

  • Wire Stretcher
  • Wire Chief
  • Utility Locator
  • Utility Lineman
  • Underground Electrician
  • Underground Conduit Installer
  • Trouble Shooter
  • Trouble Lineman
  • Trolley Wire Installer
  • Tower Erector

What They Do

  • Cut trenches for laying underground cables, using trenchers and cable plows.
  • Cut and peel lead sheathing and insulation from defective or newly installed cables and conduits prior to splicing.
  • Pull up cable by hand from large reels mounted on trucks.
  • Clean, tin, and splice corresponding conductors by twisting ends together or by joining ends with metal clamps and soldering connections.
  • Lay underground cable directly in trenches, or string it through conduit running through the trenches.
  • Trim trees that could be hazardous to the functioning of cables or wires.
  • Replace or straighten damaged poles.
  • Coordinate work assignment preparation and completion with other workers.
  • Attach cross-arms, insulators, and auxiliary equipment to poles prior to installing them.
  • Inspect and test power lines and auxiliary equipment to locate and identify problems, using reading and testing instruments.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RIC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Investigative and Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Independence and Working Conditions in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Physics - Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Troubleshooting - Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Education Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in New Jersey was $78,700 with most people making between $58,160 and $94,560

Outlook

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 1,150 people in New Jersey. It is projected that there will be 1,150 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have approximately 40 job openings annually.