Musical Instrument Repairers and Tuners

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About the Job

Repair percussion, stringed, reed, or wind instruments. May specialize in one area, such as piano tuning.

It is also Called

  • Accordion Repairer
  • Accordion Tuner
  • Band Instrument Repairer
  • Band Instrument Repairman
  • Band Instrument Repair Technician
  • Banjo Repairer
  • Banjo Repair Person
  • Bow Rehairer
  • Brass and Wind Instrument Repairer
  • Chip Tuner

What They Do

  • File metal reeds until their pitches correspond with standard tuning bar pitches.
  • Adjust lips, reeds, or toe holes of organ pipes to regulate airflow and loudness of sound, using hand tools.
  • Remove material from bars of percussion instruments to obtain specified tones, using bandsaws, sanding machines, machine grinders, or hand files and scrapers.
  • Stretch drumheads over rim hoops and tuck them around and under the hoops, using hand tucking tools.
  • Cut new drumheads from animal skins, using scissors, and soak drumheads in water to make them pliable.
  • Assemble and install new pipe organs and pianos in buildings.
  • Place rim hoops back onto drum shells to allow new drumheads to dry and become taut.
  • Strike wood, fiberglass, or metal bars of instruments, and use tuned blocks, stroboscopes, or electronic tuners to evaluate tones made by instruments.
  • Replace xylophone bars and wheels.
  • Clean, sand, and paint parts of percussion instruments to maintain their condition.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RAI.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Artistic and Investigative environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Achievement, but also value Independence and Working Conditions in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Fine Arts - Knowledge of the theory and techniques required to compose, produce, and perform works of music, dance, visual arts, drama, and sculpture.
  • Sales and Marketing - Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Quality Control Analysis - Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
  • Troubleshooting - Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
  • Repairing - Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Equipment Maintenance - Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.

Education Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in Washington was $37,010 with most people making between $23,180 and $56,560

Outlook

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 140 people in Washington. It is projected that there will be 150 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have approximately - job openings annually.