Machinists

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About the Job

Set up and operate a variety of machine tools to produce precision parts and instruments. Includes precision instrument makers who fabricate, modify, or repair mechanical instruments. May also fabricate and modify parts to make or repair machine tools or maintain industrial machines, applying knowledge of mechanics, mathematics, metal properties, layout, and machining procedures.

It is also Called

  • Aircraft Machinist
  • Auto Machinist
  • Automotive Machinist
  • Automotive Machinist Apprentice
  • Bench Hand
  • Carbide Operator
  • CNC Machinist
  • CNC Machinist (Computer Numerically Controlled Machinist)
  • Deck Engineer
  • Development Mechanic

What They Do

  • Install experimental parts or assemblies, such as hydraulic systems, electrical wiring, lubricants, or batteries into machines or mechanisms.
  • Test experimental models under simulated operating conditions for purposes such as development, standardization, or feasibility of design.
  • Advise clients about the materials being used for finished products.
  • Prepare working sketches for the illustration of product appearance.
  • Establish work procedures for fabricating new structural products, using a variety of metalworking machines.
  • Support metalworking projects from planning and fabrication through assembly, inspection, and testing, using knowledge of machine functions, metal properties and mathematics.
  • Confer with numerical control programmers to check and ensure that new programs or machinery will function properly and that output will meet specifications.
  • Design fixtures, tooling, or experimental parts to meet special engineering needs.
  • Install repaired parts into equipment or install new equipment.
  • Dismantle machines or equipment, using hand tools or power tools to examine parts for defects and replace defective parts where needed.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RCI.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Conventional and Investigative environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Working Conditions and Independence in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Design - Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.

Education Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in Washington was $48,460 with most people making between $28,250 and $74,150

Outlook

0.00%
avg. annual growth

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 5,820 people in Washington. It is projected that there will be 5,600 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have about 0 openings due to growth and about 50 replacement openings for approximately 50 total annual openings.