Pourers and Casters, Metal

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About the Job

Operate hand-controlled mechanisms to pour and regulate the flow of molten metal into molds to produce castings or ingots.

It is also Called

  • Aluminum Pourer
  • Billet Header
  • Buggy Ladle Tender
  • Bull Ladle Tender
  • Busher
  • Caster
  • Caster Operator
  • Casting Machine Operator
  • Die Cast Operator (DCO)
  • Direct Chill Caster (DC Caster)

What They Do

  • Collect samples, or signal workers to sample metal for analysis.
  • Pour and regulate the flow of molten metal into molds and forms to produce ingots or other castings, using ladles or hand-controlled mechanisms.
  • Read temperature gauges and observe color changes, adjusting furnace flames, torches, or electrical heating units as necessary to melt metal to specifications.
  • Examine molds to ensure they are clean, smooth, and properly coated.
  • Position equipment such as ladles, grinding wheels, pouring nozzles, or crucibles, or signal other workers to position equipment.
  • Skim slag or remove excess metal from ingots or equipment, using hand tools, strainers, rakes, or burners, collecting scrap for recycling.
  • Turn valves to circulate water through cores, or spray water on filled molds to cool and solidify metal.
  • Add metal to molds to compensate for shrinkage.
  • Pull levers to lift ladle stoppers and to allow molten steel to flow into ingot molds to specified heights.
  • Load specified amounts of metal and flux into furnaces or clay crucibles.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Relationships and Independence in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

Education Required

These occupations usually require a high school diploma.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in New Jersey was $36,820 with most people making between $21,670 and $56,920

Outlook

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 100 people in New Jersey. It is projected that there will be 100 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have approximately - job openings annually.