Chemical Equipment Operators and Tenders

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About the Job

Operate or tend equipment to control chemical changes or reactions in the processing of industrial or consumer products. Equipment used includes devulcanizers, steam-jacketed kettles, and reactor vessels.

It is also Called

  • Zinc Chloride Operator
  • White Lead Filterer
  • Wet Mix Operator
  • Viscose Cellar Worker
  • Viscose Cellar Charge Hand
  • Vessel Operator
  • Varnish Filterer
  • Vaporizer
  • Twitchell Operator
  • Tungsten Tender
show all

What They Do

  • Direct activities of workers assisting in control or verification of processes or in unloading of materials.
  • Inventory supplies received and consumed.
  • Estimate materials required for production and manufacturing of products.
  • Dump or scoop prescribed solid, granular, or powdered materials into equipment.
  • Implement appropriate industrial emergency response procedures.
  • Observe and compare colors and consistencies of products to instrument readings and to laboratory and standard test results.
  • Flush or clean equipment, using steam hoses or mechanical reamers.
  • Make minor repairs, lubricate, and maintain equipment, using hand tools.
  • Drain equipment and pump water or other solutions through to flush and clean tanks or equipment.
  • Read plant specifications to determine products, ingredients, or prescribed modifications of plant procedures.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Relationships and Independence in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

Education Required

These occupations usually require a high school diploma.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2014, the average annual wage in Washington was $60,850 with most people making between $39,280 and $91,820

Outlook

1.11%
avg. annual growth

During 2012, this occupation employed approximately 360 people in Washington. It is projected that there will be 400 employed in 2022.

This occupation will have about 4 openings due to growth and about 16 replacement openings for approximately 20 total annual openings.