Tire Builders

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About the Job

Operate machines to build tires.

It is also Called

  • Automobile Tire Builder
  • Auto Tire Recapper
  • Bead Builder
  • Belt Builder
  • Belt Machine Operator
  • Buffer
  • Buffer Operator
  • Builder Operator
  • Capper
  • Cord Tire Builder

What They Do

  • Place tires into molds for new tread.
  • Trim excess rubber and imperfections during retreading processes.
  • Depress pedals to collapse drums after processing is complete.
  • Measure tires to determine mold size requirements.
  • Roll hand rollers over rebuilt casings, exerting pressure to ensure adhesion between camelbacks and casings.
  • Brush or spray solvents onto plies to ensure adhesion, and repeat process as specified, alternating direction of each ply to strengthen tires.
  • Fill cuts and holes in tires, using hot rubber.
  • Rub cement sticks on drum edges to provide adhesive surfaces for plies.
  • Fit inner tubes and final layers of rubber onto tires.
  • Clean and paint completed tires.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Relationships and Independence in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Time Management - Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Education Required

These occupations usually require a high school diploma.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2012, the average annual wage in United States was $39,340 with most people making between $21,630 and $56,960

Outlook

0.00%
avg. annual growth

During 2010, this occupation employed approximately 15,000 people in United States. It is projected that there will be 14,000 employed in 2020.

This occupation will have about 0 openings due to growth and about 6,000 replacement openings for approximately 6,000 total annual openings.