Airline Pilots, Copilots, and Flight Engineers

Bookmark Print History Journal
x

Journal


    • Please sign in to view journal entries
x

Your Employment History in this Occupation

Please sign in to view Employment History
x
Rating
x

Please fill out the fields below to e-mail someone a link to this page

x
Please sign in to bookmark occupations

About the Job

Pilot and navigate the flight of fixed-wing, multi-engine aircraft, usually on scheduled air carrier routes, for the transport of passengers and cargo. Requires Federal Air Transport Pilot certificate and rating for specific aircraft type used. Includes regional, National, and international airline pilots and flight instructors of airline pilots.

It is also Called

  • Aircraft Pilot
  • Air Force Pilot
  • Airline Captain
  • Airline Captain (Line Pilot)
  • Airline Pilot
  • Airline Pilot (Captain)
  • Airline Pilot/First Officer
  • Airline Pilot Flight Instructor
  • Airline Transport Pilot
  • Airplane Pilot

What They Do

  • Evaluate other pilots or pilot-license applicants for proficiency.
  • Load smaller aircraft, handling passenger luggage and supervising refueling.
  • Plan and formulate flight activities and test schedules and prepare flight evaluation reports.
  • Instruct other pilots and student pilots in aircraft operations and the principles of flight.
  • Conduct in-flight tests and evaluations at specified altitudes and in all types of weather to determine the receptivity and other characteristics of equipment and systems.
  • File instrument flight plans with air traffic control to ensure that flights are coordinated with other air traffic.
  • Coordinate flight activities with ground crews and air traffic control and inform crew members of flight and test procedures.
  • Test and evaluate the performance of new aircraft.
  • Perform minor maintenance work, or arrange for major maintenance.
  • Make announcements regarding flights, using public address systems.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RCI.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Conventional and Investigative environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Independence and Working Conditions in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Transportation - Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
  • Geography - Knowledge of principles and methods for describing the features of land, sea, and air masses, including their physical characteristics, locations, interrelationships, and distribution of plant, animal, and human life.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Education Required

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor's degree, but some do not.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in New Jersey was $115,580 with most people making between $77,560 and $162,860

Outlook

0.93%
avg. annual growth

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 3,750 people in New Jersey. It is projected that there will be 4,100 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have about 35 openings due to growth and about 125 replacement openings for approximately 160 total annual openings.