Bus Drivers, School or Special Client

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About the Job

Transport students or special clients, such as the elderly or persons with disabilities. Ensure adherence to safety rules. May assist passengers in boarding or exiting.

It is also Called

  • Bus Driver
  • Bus Driver/Monitor
  • CDL Driver (Commercial Drivers License Driver)
  • Driver
  • School Bus Driver
  • School Bus Driver/Custodian
  • School Bus Driver/Mechanic
  • School Bus Driver/Teacher Assistant
  • School Bus Operator
  • School Transportation Director

What They Do

  • Make minor repairs to vehicles.
  • Report delays, accidents, or other traffic and transportation situations, using telephones or mobile two-way radios.
  • Keep bus interiors clean for passengers.
  • Regulate heating, lighting, and ventilation systems for passenger comfort.
  • Drive gasoline, diesel, or electrically powered multi-passenger vehicles to transport students between neighborhoods, schools, and school activities.
  • Read maps and follow written and verbal geographic directions.
  • Prepare and submit reports that may include the number of passengers or trips, hours worked, mileage, fuel consumption, or fares received.
  • Maintain knowledge of first-aid procedures.
  • Pick up and drop off students at regularly scheduled neighborhood locations, following strict time schedules.
  • Report any bus malfunctions or needed repairs.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Relationships, but also value Support and Independence in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Transportation - Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Psychology - Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Social Perceptiveness - Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.

Education Required

These occupations usually require a high school diploma.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in New Jersey was $33,190 with most people making between $20,950 and $47,400

Outlook

0.41%
avg. annual growth

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 18,350 people in New Jersey. It is projected that there will be 19,150 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have about 75 openings due to growth and about 325 replacement openings for approximately 400 total annual openings.