Sailors and Marine Oilers

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About the Job

Stand watch to look for obstructions in path of vessel, measure water depth, turn wheel on bridge, or use emergency equipment as directed by captain, mate, or pilot. Break out, rig, overhaul, and store cargo-handling gear, stationary rigging, and running gear. Perform a variety of maintenance tasks to preserve the painted surface of the ship and to maintain line and ship equipment. Must hold government-issued certification and tankerman certification when working aboard liquid-carrying vessels. Includes able seamen and ordinary seamen.

It is also Called

  • Able Bodied Seaman (AB Seaman)
  • Able Bodied Tankerman (AB Tankerman)
  • Able Bodied Watchman (AB Watchman)
  • Able Bodied Wheelsman (AB Wheelsman)
  • Able Seaman
  • Barge Hand
  • Bargeman
  • Barge Worker
  • Boat Crew Deck Hand
  • Boat Deckhand

What They Do

  • Clean and polish wood trim, brass, or other metal parts.
  • Participate in shore patrols.
  • Tie barges together into tow units for tugboats to handle, inspecting barges periodically during voyages and disconnecting them when destinations are reached.
  • Relay specified signals to other ships, using visual signaling devices, such as blinker lights or semaphores.
  • Maintain a ship's engines under the direction of the ship's engineering officers.
  • Attach hoses and operate pumps to transfer substances to and from liquid cargo tanks.
  • Record in ships' logs data such as weather conditions and distances traveled.
  • Measure depth of water in shallow or unfamiliar waters, using leadlines, and telephone or shout depth information to vessel bridges.
  • Examine machinery to verify specified pressures or lubricant flows.
  • Read pressure and temperature gauges or displays and record data in engineering logs.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Achievement and Relationships in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Transportation - Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Troubleshooting - Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Education Required

These occupations usually require a high school diploma.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2012, the average annual wage in Washington was $46,760 with most people making between $34,970 and $58,060

Outlook

0.32%
avg. annual growth

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 1,540 people in Washington. It is projected that there will be 1,590 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have about 5 openings due to growth and about 65 replacement openings for approximately 70 total annual openings.