Freight and Cargo Inspectors

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About the Job

Inspect the handling, storage, and stowing of freight and cargoes.

It is also Called

  • Tank Inspector
  • Surveyor
  • Steamboat Inspector
  • Shipping Inspector
  • Ship Surveyor
  • Safety Engineer
  • Petroleum Inspector
  • Perishable Fruit Inspector
  • Perishable Freight Inspector
  • Operations Inspector

What They Do

  • Determine types of licenses and safety equipment required, and compute applicable fees such as tolls and wharfage fees.
  • Time rolls of ships, using stopwatches.
  • Measure heights and widths of loads to ensure they will pass over bridges or through tunnels on scheduled routes.
  • Post warning signs on vehicles containing explosives or flammable or radioactive materials.
  • Calculate gross and net tonnage, hold capacities, volumes of stored fuel and water, cargo weights, and ship stability factors, using mathematical formulas.
  • Write certificates of admeasurement that list details such as designs, lengths, depths, and breadths of vessels, and methods of propulsion.
  • Issue certificates of compliance for vessels without violations.
  • Read draft markings to determine depths of vessels in water.
  • Determine cargo transportation capabilities by reading documents that set forth cargo loading and securing procedures, capacities, and stability factors.
  • Check temperatures and humidities of shipping and storage areas to ensure that they are at appropriate levels to protect cargo.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Working Conditions and Relationships in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Transportation - Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Quality Control Analysis - Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.

Education Required

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor's degree, but some do not.

LMI Region

Wages

In 2013, the average annual wage in New Jersey was $58,040 with most people making between $33,840 and $100,840

Outlook

During 2008, this occupation employed approximately 350 people in New Jersey. It is projected that there will be 350 employed in 2018.

This occupation will have approximately 10 job openings annually.